Times are changing and we are now in a time, where performance is beginning to matter to Apple iPhone users. Not too long ago, this did not. Apple used to push out it slower chipsets and they ran apps and games flawlessly. . Today, the A10 Fusion chipset from Apple, can easily run circles around its Android counterparts. We have an iPhone 7 Plus in our office right now, and it’s easy to say that it has the Pixel for breakfast when it comes to benchmarks. But I strongly feel that such a powerful processor on iOS is overkill. The iPhone 7 to an iPhone 6s user does feel swift, but it is not much of difference. In short, the new chipset could possibly render a video faster on iMovie, but in day to day use, like photography, opening apps, playing games, there is little that the new chipset does differently. So does a slower 32GB storage really matter? And should you skip over the 32GB one, sell another kidney and buy a 128GB version instead? No and No! As CNET’s Dong Ngo points out, there’s no need to fret over the slower 32GB version as its just the write speeds that are slower (for a number of reasons including its capacity). The read speeds still remain intact. What this means is that playing videos and gaming will not see a difference. The author points out that the slower right speeds don’t really matter, and this boils down to the same “overkill” theory. This is because most writing tasks do not need so much bandwidth. Ngo pens down the example of 4K video recording (the most demanding one) that barely takes up 30MBps (there’s plenty to spare). What all of this means, is that it won’t make a difference. In short, if 32GB storage is sufficient for your needs, then go for it! If you are going to be dumping massive video files on your iPhone, you will be need to opt for the 128GB which will give you a faster write speeds anyways.
Image result for iphone 7 4k
Times are changing and we are now in a time, where performance is beginning to matter to Apple iPhone users. Not too long ago, this did not. Apple used to push out it slower chipsets and they ran apps and games flawlessly. .
Today, the A10 Fusion chipset from Apple, can easily run circles around its Android counterparts. We have an iPhone 7 Plus in our office right now, and it’s easy to say that it has the Pixel for breakfast when it comes to benchmarks. But I strongly feel that such a powerful processor on iOS is overkill.
The iPhone 7 to an iPhone 6s user does feel swift, but it is not much of difference. In short, the new chipset could possibly render a video faster on iMovie, but in day to day use, like photography, opening apps, playing games, there is little that the new chipset does differently. So does a slower 32GB storage really matter? And should you skip over the 32GB one, sell another kidney and buy a 128GB version instead? No and No!
As CNET’s Dong Ngo points out, there’s no need to fret over the slower 32GB version as its just the write speeds that are slower (for a number of reasons including its capacity). The read speeds still remain intact. What this means is that playing videos and gaming will not see a difference. The author points out that the slower right speeds don’t really matter, and this boils down to the same “overkill” theory.
This is because most writing tasks do not need so much bandwidth. Ngo pens down the example of 4K video recording (the most demanding one) that barely takes up 30MBps (there’s plenty to spare). What all of this means, is that it won’t make a difference.
In short, if 32GB storage is sufficient for your needs, then go for it! If you are going to be dumping massive video files on your iPhone, you will be need to opt for the 128GB which will give you a faster write speeds anyways.
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